If you have found this blog, saying “Welcome” does not really seem appropriate. I know you wish you weren’t surfing the Internet for information about diabetes. I felt the same.

A big part of me wishes I were not writing about diabetes, nor did I anticipate to become so informed on the subject, but it happened.

In 2009, when my son was 20 months old he was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes. It wasn’t really part of the plan…

…Correction. It was NOT part of the plan. But it happened. He is now nine years old.

It is not always easy, but I think we are all doing okay, and I hope we continue to do so. I am happy to say that diabetes has not kept him from doing anything a person without diabetes does. And it shouldn’t!

When I see a 20-month-old child now, I still cannot believe how small he was at the time. It took a good part of a year and then some to accept this diagnosis, learn the management basics, and settle into our new norm.

I took a leave of absence from my job at a well-known corporate where I was consulting on a career of over 15 years of healthcare experience. After a few months, I went back to work.

In order to have the flexibility needed to care for my son, I could no longer work as a healthcare consultant. I took an operations job in education and development.

In 2014, I began to blog about my experiences as the mother of a child with Type 1. I also started to speak at medical conferences as an advocate for people living with diabetes and their families. The more I listened to the stories that physicians shared about the challenges of people with diabetes, the more I realized that I needed to, and could, do more.

I always thought about the difficulty of diagnosis. Because of my profession, I knew where to look to find quality care and information about diabetes. I had access to a network of people to ask where I should go. Despite this, it was still incredibly difficult.

While everyone has to live his or her own diabetes journey, I at least wanted to help somehow. If at all possible, flatten that learning curve on the road to successful diabetes management – regardless of the type of diabetes. I wanted to help and be part of the solution. So in July 2016, I left my corporate job and started DiapointME.

I hope you will find this blog and this website to be a useful resource. We have many interesting things planned – events for people with diabetes and their families, the D-Shop with some really cool products and other things. I hope you stick around and join us on this journey.

The one thing I ask is that you note the first rule of diabetes care: follow up with your doctor and/or nurse educator about your care, diagnosis or medication. We work closely with clinics, doctors and others to ensure the quality of what we do. However, if you do not have a medical practitioner that is helping you, then please do not give up until you find the right one.

And, if you have any feedback, questions or suggestions, we would love to hear from you!

 

5 Essentials for Managing Type 1 Diabetes at School

Diabetes directives and supplies for school

Relieve some of the anxiety you feel whenever your child with Type 1 Diabetes heads to school for the day.

You'll find tips on educating the teacher and nurse, making emergency snack boxes, traveling on the school bus and more.


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